Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Winning Words 2/19/13
“I’m forever letting tomorrow’s work slop backwards into today’s.”  (J.A. Spender) Slop is an onomatopoeia word, sounding like its meaning.  Sometimes we spoil today by concentrating too much on tomorrow.  The Sermon on the Mount advises, “Let tomorrow take care of tomorrow.”  This is one in a list of “Bible Verses for Tough Times,” that I came across recently.  “Today is the day I worried about yesterday!”    ;-)  Jack

 FROM WALMART REV:  The old story came back to me about the lazy cowhand that was just hired by the rancher and found in his bunk on Monday morning while the rest of the crew was out working the range...when asked why he was still in the sack, he replied: "Well, I woke up thinking since the day after tomorrow is Wednesday and with the week half over, I might as well wait and start working next Monday!" 0;-0////JACK:  A few pastors are like that when it comes to making "calls."

 FROM HONEST JOHN:  I always found that working ahead opened up more possibilities for the future days.////JACK:  There's something to be said being prepared by working ahead.  I have a sign on my wall: "If it weren't for the last minute, a lot of things wouldn't get done."

 FROM MICHIZONA RAY:  I've done that before...worrying about yesterday, and all I got out of it was regret. Regret can be a useful experience -- if it helps to keep me from repeating a sloppy act.////JACK:  Last minute work is usually sloppy work.

 FROM TAMPA SHIRL:  One day at a time.  Otherwise there is unnecessary stress, which is not good for anyone.  Some  days are harder than others, as we all know  Some times it is harder to be young at heart, especially when someone is ill and suffering.////JACK:  Sometimes the soup tastes better when it's allowed to simmer.

 FROM SHARIN' SHARON:  Definitely on-the-mark quote for me--however I'd like to not think it's "forever". Working to change this tendency to worry about things that probably will never happen--and have plenty of friends who tell me not to worry, including you.////JACK:  The slopping action is sometimes hard to control.  But, if at first you don't succeed...(you know the rest).

 FROM OUTHOUSE JUDY:  How very true but how very hard to do.  Today is a brand new day and yesterday is a memory.////JACK:  The secret of affecting change...Don't give up!

 FROM ILLINOIS LIZ AND HER DAD:  Like.////JACK:  Great minds think a-LIKE!

 FROM GOOD DEBT JON:  Jack liked the term onomatopoeia, I suppose that describes some of the esemplastic words I created when I did Good Debt, Bad Debt.  Such as: Debtabetes, and Consumerati.  Folks instinctively know what they mean.  Sadly I am familiar with slop too.////JACK:  Esemplastic is a new word for me, but I read that it was said to have been invented by the poet Coleridge, 200 years ago.  There's always something old that seems to be new.

 FROM BLAZING OAKS:  Buzzzzzzz! Clank! Pow! (and Slop is a pretty descriptive word!) PRAY, HOPE, DON'T WORRY  advises Saint Padre Pio. Good advice for any day; I like your quote "Today is the Tomorrow we worried about Yesterday" If what we worried about occurs, we've lived it twice, if not, we needn't have agonized ...////JACK:  Onomatopoeia is a fun word to say.  Can you think of any others?

2 comments:

Ray Gage said...

I've done that before...worrying about yesterday, and all I got out of it was regret. Regret can be a useful experience -- if it helps to keep me from repeating a sloppy act.

Anonymous said...

Definitely on-the-mark quote for me--however I'd like to not think it's "forever". Working to change this tendency to worry about things that probably will never happen--and have plenty of friends who tell me not to worry, including you.
S.H. in MI