Monday, February 11, 2013

Winning Words 2/11/13
“That which is not good for the beehive is not good for the bees.”  (Marcus Aurelius)  In 2006, it was noted that a “Mystery Disease” was killing off honey bees.  This was a major problem, because what’s bad for the bees is bad for all of us.  M.A. wrote that to learn about self, we should look at nature.  There’s more than one reason to talk about the birds and the bees.  Nature says, “Take care of this fragile environment.”    ;-)  Jack

 FROM HONEST JOHN:  Too many idiots out there. In the Tea Party who think that they can treat the beehive with impunity.////JACK:  Perhaps the No-Nothing Party has had a rebirth with a different agenda.

 FROM SHARIN' SHARON:  My favorite gardening book is "The Garden Primer" by Barbara Damrosch. In it she says to be a good gardener, a person needs to think like a plant. To me that means a person should let go of selfishness and control and stop fighting with nature, learn to respect it, really begin to try to understand the plant's needs. Maybe then that same stance can generalize to people and animals too. Great WW again today!!!////JACK:  I remember when boxer Muhammed Ali said, "I float like a butterfly, sting like a bee."  He did, too!  I like the idea of trying "think like a plant," or a bee.

 FROM MICHIZONA RAY:  I think the parable of the talents suggests we are to care for or "invest" all our gifts in all respects...environment included. Actually, the environment seems much more sturdy to me than it could be described as fragile. Look how quickly it recovers from forest fires, volcano eruptions, and even oil spills and tainted ground. God is indeed much more powerful than man can ever pretend to be!////JACK:  Every beginning has an end.  At least, the idea of a Judgment Day indicates that there will come a time when there will be no more chances.  Only "G-d" is uncreated and eternal, or so say the theologians.  Granted that this earth is a very forgiving planet, but does that mean seventy time seven?////RAY:  Not at all. Hence, the parable of the talents that points to our unavoidable stewardship. Given that there is a season for all things, and all things a season, it is crucial that we take proper care of that which we have been given. Whether something is eternal or temporal, it is of no matter with regard to how we care for it; nor does the quality of fragility determine proper care. The system that God has put in place is very sturdy, and nontheless requires respectful treatment as a matter of stewardship. On the other hand, If that which we care for does not respond in kind, then I would say the seventy times seven rule indeed applies.////JACK:  In 1941, Winston Churchill visited Harrow School (where he had attended as a youth) to speak to the students. He stood before the students and said, "Never, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, give up. Never give up. Never give up. Never give up."  I think that that attitude should apply to caring for this world.////RAY:  I would agree with one caveat; that we focus on one another with the higher priority.

 FROM WALMART REV:  You have spoken and have said it best . . . you've left me speechless . . . or did I just say something!?////JACK:  The beehive is used by Christians as a symbol, representing the Church, where there are many workers dedicated to the Queen (Christ).

 FROM DR J AT BGSU:  ;-) I teach about this!////JACK:  Some people never learn, or simply choose to reject the teaching.  However, I sense that some minds are beginning to open.

 FROM BLAZING OAKS:  Moody Bible Institute had a documentary on the Life of Bees, relating it to the Christian Faith, many, many years ago. it was fascinating, and I showed to my H.S. S.S. classes for several years  . Your WW today made me think of it again. What a wonder-filled world we live in!  I read in THIS WEEK (Jan 25th) that new data from NASA's Kepler Telescope  suggests that there may be as many as 17 billion planets the size of Earth in the galaxy, dramatically increasing the odds that extraterrestrial life exists.  Kepler recently discovered 461 new planets, bringing a total of 2,740 , since 2009.   One in six stars in the Milky Way has an Earth-sized planet researchers now estimate. Amazing!  The amount of new info.all the time!////JACK:  I have a hard time comprehending 17 billion.  But I don't have a problem believing in a God who can create that many...and more.  One earth is miracle enough for me.

 FROM CL IN CALIFORNIA:  AMEN to that . we seem to take so many things like that for granted  ////JACK:  Every piece of this earth, large or small, has a reason for its existence...even you and me.

 FROM OUTHOUSE JUDY:  We should take care of ourselves just like we should take care of our environment.  God gave us the bees and our beings, blessed be God!////JACK:  Do you remember the book, The Silent Spring, and the difference that it made?

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

My favorite gardening book is "The Garden Primer" by Barbara Damrosch. In it she says to be a good gardener, a person needs to think like a plant. To me that means a person should let go of selfishness and control and stop fighting with nature, learn to respect it, really begin to try to understand the plant's needs. Maybe then that same stance can generalize to people and animals too. Great WW again today!!!
S.H. in MI

Ray Gage said...

I think the parable of the talents suggests we are to care for or "invest" all our gifts in all respects...environment included. Actually, the environment seems much more sturdy to me than it could be described as fragile. Look how quickly it recovers from forest fires, volcano eruptions, and even oil spills and tainted ground. God is indeed much more powerful than man can ever pretend to be!

Ray Gage said...

Not at all. Hence, the parable of the talents that points to our unavoidable stewardship. Given that there is a season for all things, and all things a season, it is crucial that we take proper care of that which we have been given. Whether something is eternal or temporal, it is of no matter with regard to how we care for it; nor does the quality of fragility determine proper care. The system that God has put in place is very sturdy, and nontheless requires respectful treatment as a matter of stewardship. On the other hand, If that which we care for does not respond in kind, then I would say the seventy times seven rule indeed applies.

Ray Gage said...

I would agree with one caveat; that we focus on one another with the higher priority.