Thursday, January 24, 2013

Winning Words 1/24/13
“The angel fetched Peter out of prison, but it was prayer that fetched the angel.”  (Thomas Watson)  St. Jude is referred to as “the Saint of lost causes.”  Prayer is often used as a last resort.  What is prayer?  I see it as a way of letting God know about our concerns.  God is like a loving parent who answers a child’s request…”Yes…No…, or Let’s wait and see.”  Sometimes God moves in mysterious ways with answers.    ;-)  Jack

  FROM WALMART REV:  How true . . . an adventure in itself . . . this business of prayer.  I have so much more to learn between prayer as a disciplined righteous work on our part and a constant relational walk with our Lord.////JACK:  Prayer is sometimes referred to as an "exercise."  Just as physical exercise strengthens the body, so does spiritual exercise strengthen the "soul."  Prayer is like spiritual push-ups.

 FROM TAMPA SHIRL:  Thy will be done.  Work like everything depends on you and pray like everything depends upon God.////JACK:  I've used that line before, and it needs to be repeated.  The words are attributed to Martin Luther (Pray like it all depends on God, then when you are done, go work like it all depends on you.), but he might have gotten it from an earlier source.

 FROM MICHIZONA RAY:  Maybe...I'm not so sure what fetched the angel. I can think of several possibilities. I think this might be an oversimplified wish of our human desire to think so, much like we construct mythic super-heroes who come to our rescue when we call. It seems to me that our prayer is more a reflection of our relationship with God. We might seek first this relational development with Jesus, seeking first an understanding of His Word, seeking first to adjust our Wills with that of our Father, ...and maybe we'll find the angels have been stirred long before any of our petitions.////JACK:  I don't like caps which say, "One size fits all."  I like ones that fit me.  In a way, it's the same with prayer.  Each prayer is individual, relating to individual needs.  While The Lord's Prayer is general in nature, the various petitions are meant to fit the needs of the pray-er.  "Deliver us (me) from evil," as related to Peter's situation, is an example of this.

 FROM PLAIN FOLKS CHESTER:  I just can't resist this, "A far fetched story." And you would think me remiss if U didn't.////JACK:  I know the traditional meaning of the word, "fetch," as a verb, but I also like it when it is used as a noun in modern slang, meaning...awesome!  The release of Peter from prison by an angel, in answer to prayer, is an awesome story.

 FROM JB, A MONEY MANAGER:  Good morning…. You will notice in my next newsletter I am “borrowing” one of your recent quotes and comments!   I should probably start giving you some credit in my newsletter.////JACK:  It's the thought that counts, not the credit.  Many of our thoughts are borrowed from others.  I'm going to guess that quote you will refer to is about the rich and the poor.

 FROM BLAZING OAKS:  GOOD THOUGHT!  I'M A FIRM BELIEVER  IN THE POWER OF PRAYER, EVEN THO SOME HAVE GONE UNASWERED OVER THE YEARS (AS FAR AS I KNOW...)  I HAVE ALSO EXPERIENCED SOME DRAMATIC ANSWERS TO PRAYER PETITIONS, SO KEEP  "COMMUNICATING" WITH THE ALIMIGHTY!!  THANKS FOR THIS REMINDER THAT WE CAN PARTICIPATE IN GOD'S WORK BY"CALLING FOR THE ANGELS"! ////JACK:  Your response cause me to ponder....What is the "power" of prayer?  Many of us who have prayer concerns want to believe that God will provide "yes" answers.  "No" answers are answers, too, although, most of the time, we're wanting the "yes" response.  "Thy will be done" is in the Lord's Prayer for a reason.

 FROM JT IN MICHIGAN:  Another one to add to my list of quotations!!   Thank you.////JACK:  Speaking of collections, I once remember meeting a pastor in Chicago who would visit "Skid Row" men who were patients at Cook County Hospital.  He would minister to their spiritual and physical needs, even to the point of cutting their toenails.  He had saved some of the longer and curly ones and displayed them in a folder which he showed to me.

 FROM INDY GENIE:  A friend once (or twice) told me "God works in mysterious ways, His wonders to perform" and I believe him :)////JACK:  I used to listen to a radio program, "I Love a Mystery."  I still love mysteries, especially the ones that show the presence of God in our daily life.

 FROM JUDY E IN MICHIGAN:  St. Jude works. I know he is my namesake. God does move in mysterious ways with answers and prayer finds St. Jude, the angels, especially our guardian angel, and other saints.  St. Anthony can find lost things and God if you’re in a real pinch.////JACK:  Today, I was in a card shop and saw a statue of St. Joseph.  On the box, it said that if you were selling your house, you should set the statue on the counter, and it would help.  Who's to say how the mysteries of God work?

 FROM OUTHOUSE JUDY:  I talk to God a lot.  I'm not sure that would be considered prayer, but I know He hears me.  I have separate times for prayer but mostly I talk with Him.////JACK:  There are many ways to pray.  Talking to God is one of them.








1 comment:

Ray Gage said...

Maybe...I'm not so sure what fetched the angel. I can think of several possibilities. I think this might be an oversimplified wish of our human desire to think so, much like we construct mythic super-heroes who come to our rescue when we call. It seems to me that our prayer is more a reflection of our relationship with God. We might seek first this relational development with Jesus, seeking first an understanding of His Word, seeking first to adjust our Wills with that of our Father, ...and maybe we'll find the angels have been stirred long before any of our petitions.